Sep 24, 2015 Newsletter

Sep 24 2015

“A wild goose could become a tame goose, but a tame goose could never become wild.”

Kierkegaard

Our emails, once a week, will keep New Orleanians informed about the State of Grain in our city and our region. As you know, Bellegarde is the only bakery in between Asheville and Arizona that stone-mills its own flour. We strive to source organic grains that we mill fresh and bake into healthy and delicious whole grain breads. We are convinced that the health issues which plague our city—obesity, violence, mis-education, ecological and cultural erosion—are bound to the lack of fresh food. Food access is a systemic Policy issue: everyday that we bake whole grain bread with freshly milled flour, we tweak one more nerve in the System. Each nerve pinch is our desire to re-establish our region as a self-efficient food economy and re-create the cuisine of New Orleans with fresh ingredients…a revolutionary Gordian knot.

We all speak the language of food and we all seek the pleasure of flavor. What more perfect medium to communicate change than with bread? Pandering to demand in a regional food system is not as important as nurturing supply: quality will dictate quantity. Help us democratize that staff of life.

Blog Posts: I have posted a blog today because of someone I recently lost, and about the people who inspire me. Baking is the medium of a million passions, and friendship is supreme. Why bake bread if you cannot share it? It’s here if you are interested: https://bellegardebakery.wordpress.com/2015/09/24/an-appian-way/

Our New Stone Mill: For photos of our new stone mill, arriving in three weeks, please visit this website: http://elmoremtbread.blogspot.com; our friends at Elmore Mountain Bakery in Vermont are building our mill and they documented the process last year. Our mill will be one of the largest in the country and will drastically increase our capacity to process whole grains. We are currently milling Identity Preserved (IP) organic grain from Pomona, California, as well as Louisiana Rice, rye, and organic yellow corn. We are securing a few thousand pounds of IP wheat from Kansas and Oklahoma; both grown from American seed that is more than 150 years old. Please stop by our booth at the farmers market to see photos of the mill, or call the shop with any questions.